Homemade Bug Spray

Green Lizard's Blog

Officially it’s not allowed to make your own treatments for bugs and problems on your allotment.

(So I’m not advocating that anyone tries this on their plants.)

Black Fly on the Broad Beans

We’ve had a problem with our beautiful broad beans.


They’ve got black fly!

Oh no!

Now insecticide is out of the question. We keep bees. Insecticide is terrible.

So from our bee keeping we’ve learned that bugs don’t like thyme. We took some home grown dried thyme and ground it into a fine powder.

Then we put it a pan with hot water to make a ‘tea’. We added a squirt of washing up liquid.


Now we also know that ants don’t like cinnamon. The ants farm the black fly. They carry them onto the plant. So we added cinnamon oil to the cooled liquid.

Then we filtered it through kitchen paper in a sieve.


The washing…

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Having done a lot of counting on the way, then re-counting, we have now delivered the collected Express and Star vouchers to the Queen Street offices and handed them over, packaged up into bundles of five hundred: our first target!

 

A big thanks to everyone on the plots who handed them in, posted them in the box, or dropped them into the shop or cajoled, bribed and extorted a few extra from friends, family and neighbours.

A second set of thanks to Landywood, Cheslyn Hay and Moat Hall Primary schools who added to our collection. Moat Hall’s contribution of two thousand, six hundred and forty eight (yes, really!) was an amazing effort: thank you.

The final number of vouchers we collected, with your help was three thousand two hundred and forty five!

Now we await the results. Staff at the Express and Star and Home Serve will decide what proportion of the thirty thousand pounds we are given to put towards our planned Great War Legacy Garden project. So far we have been working with Cheslyn Hay Scouts, the parish council and Cheslyn Hay Historical Society (who also donated some vouchers) and the Royal British Legion.

If anyone has any ideas, information (it would be great if we could find records of people who had allotments in Cheslyn Hay before or during the First World War) or skills you need to drop us a line (either here or on Facebook) or simply drop by the site one day and ask for a committee member.

But, in the meantime, thanks for the support of the voucher collection.

CHEESE AND WINE : VENUE CHANGE!

 

Cheslyn Hay Scout Group have let us know we can no longer use their scout hut on November 22nd.

Because of this we will now be holding the Cheese and Wine event at Cheslyn Hay Village Hall (in Pinfold Lane).

Everything else will be as advertised (quiz, wine, cheese, chat, tea, coffee … oh and £1 admission … in advance or on the door.)

Hope to see you there.

What to do in November – 2

Timely reminders ?

digginwivdebb

November seems to have snuck up on me without me looking.  You wouldn’t be able to tell by the weather that we are in November as it has, so far, been relatively mild for the end of Autumn. I just hope that the mild weather continues for as long as possible.

November for me always signifies the big tidy up and prepare for the upcoming Spring months that are just around the corner.  The dark nights prevent much evening work so my weekends are always busy and fully booked.  I do like a tidy plot though and without all of the annual weeds growing back quickly as soon as I have removed them, I have a fighting chance! There are still lots that can be done and the list below will hopefully give you an idea of some of the jobs that you can be doing this month to stay…

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Cheese and Wine Get Together.

Cheese and Wine Evening.

Saturday, November 22nd

Doors open: 7 p.m.

Cheslyn Hay Scouts Hut,

Rosemary Road,

Cheslyn Hay

Open to all: Tickets in advance or on the door £1

Price includes: cheese, wine (bring home made or shop bought bottles to the open table), tea, coffee, and “nibbles”.

DSC02038

So …it’s been a good year for fruit and berries

… and we have a lot of wine makers on the plot.

Here’s your chance to get a taste of some of those wines,

Have a chat (you pick the subject)

And join a team for a quiz (varied subjects) which will generate discussion and opinion.

(This is the format that worked well and proved popular last year (when a lot of you asked for another one)).

All welcome – if you’ve never been to an allotment “shindig” before, why not come along and see what goes on when we’re not on the plots?

Jobs for October

The Garden Smallholder

Clocks have gone back, days are drawing in quick and the threat of the first frost looms. Cold biting winds, falling leaves and dreary weather are signalling the end of the gardening year, take a moment to look around you and marvel at October’s autumn colour palette. It sure is beautiful, especially when the sun shines. There are still jobs to be getting on with in the vegetable garden, so don’t put your tools away just yet!

Some jobs for October:

  • Keep picking those courgettes and beans before the first frost arrives
  • Sow green manures
  • Tidy the strawberry bed, pot up stray runners and overwinter in a greenhouse or well-lit shed
  • Make a leaf bin and start collecting fallen leaves to make leaf mould
  • Start planting garlic at the end of the month
  • Harvest and carve pumpkins for Halloween/Samhain celebrations
  • Autumn sow hardy broad beans (Aquaduce Claudia) and peas (Meteor) for an early crop late spring

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Express and Star: The Great-War-Legacy Garden Project.

 

Our local daily newspaper the Express and Star is offering funding for community projects.

Cash 6 RH 13

 

 

Following a couple of committee meetings we decided to apply, hoping to be selected. The project we put forward reflects this time in history, allotment traditions and expands our community.

Mick Powell, current chairman has been to initial meetings about ways to commemorate the First World War in a local sense. These have been hosted, I believe by the parish council and have included, variously, The Boy’s Brigade, Scouts, Royal British Legion and Cheslyn hay Local History Society.

Our application, discussed at length, was – in a nutshell – to recreate something like a World war One allotment/ and or back garden.

I have since heard that our group, meeting the criteria has been selected.

So please, if you have the Express and Star save the Cash for your Community vouchers that will be printed over the next month and let us have them. Every one will help (the number that we collect will be important in deciding how much funding we get.

We will also need to know more about allotments of the time: what crops were grown and what techniques used.

If you have that information, expertise or any other information we would love to hear from you, so that over a four year period we can build a real living-history site to be proud of.